Scott Sueme Feature Image - Mayberry Fine Art

In Conversation with Scott Sueme

March 19th, 2021, discussion with gallery artist Scott Sueme about his process and preparing for the Building Buildings exhibition on display in Winnipeg. Gallery associate Elise Dawson poses a series of questions to the artist, followed by a short period for questions.

Scott Sueme Interview Transcript

Elise
So just to introduce Scott, for those who may be unfamiliar with him, Scott Sueme is a Canadian artist based in Vancouver, B.C., currently working out of a studio in East Vancouver. Since attending Emily Carr University in 2006, he has been working as a graphic artist and painter, starting in the graffiti subculture. He’s been through art, design and installation painting Sueme exhibited internationally in New York, San Francisco, Miami and Cape Town, South Africa. So welcome, Scott.

Elise
Yeah, yeah, I’m going to I’m going to go easy on you, so. All right, so, Scott, how did you get your start in art?

Scott
I got my start through skateboarding. I think that’s kind of my earliest. Like transition, I guess, or playing sports as a kid, playing soccer. I was in like taekwondo, all kinds of different sports played on all the teams. And then I think skateboarding was like the first, like moments where it’s sort of a combination of the two. So, like, freeing and that you can kind of do whatever you want with it. So the creativity element and the culture of it, seeing the graphics on the boards, seeing that just all of that kind of made me want to draw my own designs or kind of explore my own creativity and yeah, I think that’s like my earliest start that kind of led me to painting graffiti and exploring that whole subculture as well. So that all kind of started with skateboarding.

Elise
Hmm. So can you still ollie today?

Scott
I can still ollie,I i can still kickflip, probably like, yeah, I have a couple of bruises on my skin by the time it was done.

Elise
So you remember what it was like, some of the first things you would have drawn on, like your board or a binder or a backpack.

Scott
Oh. Yeah, I think it was I mean, even earlier before that, I was still drawing, so I would draw. Like logos and signs and just very graphic stuff, I wasn’t really like drawing people or much of that, I think I had a very graphic approach to to drawing things. Yeah, that’s kind of why graffiti was such a good fit for me. It’s very systematic and typography based.

Elise
So without revealing too much, did you ever get into doing like large walls or did you keep the graffiti to the studio?

Scott
Oh, no, I mean, I was out there. I traveled to many different cities and painted graffiti in L.A., San Francisco, Toronto, Montreal, other other places. So I definitely was an outdoor artist.

Elise
You got around

Scott
Yeah i Idid.

Elise
So do you think do you think your earlier experiences with graffiti or skateboarding, do you think that still shows up in your art today?

Scott

A hundred percent, I think it’s not really in an aesthetic way, per se, but more so in some of the I guess the colour exploration, I think, with graffiti your always, whether you’re painting a wall or something, it’s a certain color combinations and you’re constantly trying to do something new the next time. So it’s really just a hardcore numbers game early on. So trying to do the most, trying to keep the variation quite high. So I think it shows up in my work in terms of maybe scale. It helped me kind of translate my work to larger buildings, doing murals and things like that to think bigger. And also just the numbers like this painting lots of pieces. It really created this this kind of militant mindset with fine art, like not that I’m trying to crank out as many pieces that I can because I’m still trying to protect the integrity of the work. But it does kind of light a fire under you to just, like, keep going and press on and not think to preciously about what you have just done and just move on to the next one.

Elise
Yeah. It Reminds me of something my professor told me when she’s like, you make a good painting, make ten of them. A similar kind of attitude where you’re there is that like almost that competitive ethos, a spirit that keeps you going. And I think it allows you not to remain so stuck.

Scott
Definitely.

Elise
Yeah, so speaking of stuck, so do you ever have, like a bad day in the studio?

Scott
Sure. Yeah, I think I think. There’s days where I’ll paint over some of my work a lot if I’m not feeling it. So, yeah, there’s some days where you’re taking like three steps back and like half a step forward. And there’s other days where you’re you’re maybe thinking great move after, great move. So, yeah, there’s definitely those days where it’s kind of it feels like you backtrack, but.

Elise
Do you have any specific strategies that help you get back on track?

Scott
I find, looking helps a lot, so when you’re having a bad day or when I’m having a bad day, you tend to your first reaction is to like, how can I quickly get back to, pressing forward with this painting, but in actuality, you should really take a step back and just look and give the painting its own space and time before re-entering the space to do something new on it. So my first reaction is always like, oh, I’m going to do maybe I should add this or maybe I should subtract that and take that away. But really like, you know, after I sleep on it or spend a couple days maybe not working on that piece, I end up making a better move at the end. So.

Elise
So what is an average day in the studio like for you? Is there coffee involved?

Scott
Oh, yeah, we are often. I actually have a coffee at home and on some days I’ll get into the studio, drive down and and have a second one, but average day, I don’t know if there is really a stat like an average day in the studio. Between building, which I’m trying to build some of my own panels, so I’m doing a lot of woodworking in the space on certain days, a lot of either cleaning, organizing, I have studio visits occasionally as well. So to talking to friends, doing admin stuff, that there’s kind of like a it’s really a mixed bag of of what I’m doing on a day to day. If it’s usually it’s not very quiet or lonely down here. So that’s a good thing.

Elise
Yeah. That’s why I asked. Sometimes people just assume that artists just get to paint when really like, there’s so much else involved.

Scott
Yeah, painting is really a rare bird if I often come down on the weekends as well. So usually Monday to Friday, if I’m not like putting out fires or doing whatever, if I paint like maybe like three days during the week, that’s like really good. But a lot of my painting happens on the weekend when it’s like really quiet down here. But yeah, I would say, like for me, painting during the week nine to five is not something that it’s an average thing that happens.

Scott
So yeah, you got to fight for that. Those those those quiet, quiet days, you know.

Elise
Yeah, totally get that.

Elise
So I guess I’ll talk a little bit more about your painting process while we’re on that.

Scott
OK

Elise
So do you compose your images on your canvases or do you sort of create sketches before you begin?

Scott
I sort of do a bit of a bit of both. So I do use the computer or like digital methods to kind of sketch or catalogue certain imagery to then, like, compose onto the painting itself. Recently I’ve been doing more like intuitive underpinnings, so I don’t know if you can see behind me, but. I’ll get out of the way and that one right there. I’ll just kind of like a wash and kind of divide the composition into two or three shapes. And then from there, I’ll either sketch directly on the surface or I’ll take a photo of it and then go into Photoshop and work digitally on it. So, yeah, I kind of bounce around a bit. Other times I’ll just like start straight from on the computer with the size a dimension in mind that I want to work on. So it’s sort of like whatever I feel. Most comfortable with in the moment, and it kind of comes in waves, there’s times where I’m working more digitally first and then more painting later. Other times, if I do that for too long, I’ll get really bored of that and want to just throw paint around and then kind of paint my way out of scenarios.

Elise
I understand that painting you way out of something.

Elise
It’s sort of you nake make an intentional mistake here and then I have to fix it.

Scott
Yes. And that can often be like a really exciting way to work because it, it gives you an opportunity to. Yeah, not only make mistakes, but discover something that you that you wouldn’t have done if you if you were premeditating a lot of these decisions, but the digital stuff really helps get cycle through different decisions very quickly, whereas painting can be a much more slower burning process in that regard.

Elise

Yeah, I get that. Do you have? Well, I guess you sort of answered my question. You don’t quite have a favourite way of working. That’s something I saw in another interview that you did was maybe I if I understand correctly, that you sometimes use cutout paper shapes on a projector. Is that true?

Scott
Yeah, I, I’ve worked that way before. I haven’t done that more so recently. I’ve gotten more into like cataloging those cut paper forms in a digital file in that way it’s just there on my computer and I can, I can manipulate them in the digital space in the same way with analog but cut paper cut shapes that sort of definitely been an ongoing part of my process. And it just it just manifests in different ways as I’m evolving it or thinking about it differently makes sense to me.

Elise
So let’s talk a little bit about building buildings. So it seems to be like your understanding of space and form seems pretty influenced by architecture or by design. Am I right? What drew you to this theme?

Scott
Yeah. Yeah. Thanks for asking. Yeah. With this most recent work, I think with my paintings in a general sense, I think I’m always interested in like the subconscious manifestation of themes and ideas or metaphors or, or ways of connecting what I’m painting to what I’m seeing or living with building buildings. I was initially just thinking a lot more about texture and paint and that was sort of showing up in how I was building, the composition’s as well, creating these sort of more vertical, I was calling them like stacks where shapes are kind of like fitted on balanced almost on top of each other.

Scott
And I think. It was that and kind of like building more texture, with being more liberal, with how I was applying the paint to the surface. But aside from the studio stuff, I think being in this quarantine or lockdown state that we’re all kind of having a shared experience in in one way or another. I was sort of. Yeah, turning more inward and not really looking at external factors for inspiration, so I’d be like going on walks with my partner and looking at houses and stuff. We were actually in the process of moving as well. This is like all during while I was like creating the show. So we were, looking at different buildings, which sounds really funny,

Elise
Its funny but it’s almost like it’s like I thought there’s like a kind of a humor in your work because some of the names of the paintings like the eighth or the seven-story paintings and the long vertical ones, like, yeah, you’re fine

Scott
Thank you.

Scott
Well, it was it was funny to me that I didn’t realize that that’s what was taking place in my life and connecting that to the work itself. We were just looking at buildings every single day and the show title only came much later on. So it. Yeah, it was just a great example of just how sometimes these concepts are so subconscious and I don’t actually know or I’m fully aware of the stories that I’m I’m painting about until I reflect on them at a later time. But, yeah, I mean, I think being isolated and not being able to travel and and inject new stories into my work was really eye-opening experience to kind of like make art where you are and kind of look to what’s around you and have that make an effect and then appearance in the work.

Elise
That’s great. So do you think it’s important to understand the meaning of the work of art? Or what does your art mean to you?

Scott
Yeah, I think I think it’s important to. To, understand the meaning of the work in relation to yourself and what that means to you. So some of my paintings, what they mean to me, might not resonate in the same way with you. And that’s totally. Totally OK. The painting is just like I think I read somewhere, it’s like the painting is just a lighter and your mind is the cigar?

Elise
Yeah

Scott
Yeah. So I think it’s it’s like what. It’s totally reliant on the viewer and like what they and because they’re bringing their own experiences to the table, they’re bringing their own understanding to the table. But for me, I think my art is a way for me to, discuss my memories, explore my curiosity and my almost like my subconscious again. And it’s also like a form of meditation for me as well, like which is becoming more and more important today to have something physical or real-world that takes my occupation and keeps my time. So in a way, it’s like a vocation. It’s a way to store my memories. Yeah, that’s kind of what painting is to me. I’m just so grateful for the activity of it, the act of doing it.

Elise
Yeah, it’s there’s something about the act of painting that becomes kind of a mindfulness exercise. Like it’s not it’s like it is distracting in a way, but it’s also like you need to be aware of your own body while you’re doing it.

Elise
Do you find that?

Scott
Yeah, yeah, it’s like an awareness, it’s a it’s a way to process thinking as well, you know, while you’re working, you’re also thinking about how your day went, you’re thinking about it’s like it’s like a form of being in the shower, you know, a great space to process stuff and just kind of watch your mind kind of. Go from thought to thought and process everything.

Elise
So unlike a shower, how do you know when a painting is finished?

Scott
oo yeah, that’s. That’s a good question, I think. I think I look for a certain, attributes in a painting. Certain words come to mind like. Harmony, tension. The way things settle, I kind of look for that. And they’re sort of a like tipping point with certain paintings where they look very unfinished and then they start to like, you’ll maybe make one or two marks and then it flips and starts to look like it’s it’s like on the home stretch and then at that point you’re just doing detail work to kind of help it along to get there.

Elise
That makes so much sense to me.

Elise
So, like, you spend a lot of time, time if you ever have a hard time letting go of them, like when you get a show together and you ship it off to the gallery.

Scott
I don’t think so at all, really. I used to, especially with the shipping stuff, like watching the DHL guy just like haul it away, you’re like oh god, that’s such a yeah, it used to really freak me out, but also. But no, I don’t I think overall, it’s like I’m just thankful for the vocation of the gift of being able to make something of the painting, it’s just like a symbol of that. So if someone wants it afterwards, that’s a beautiful thing, and that’s a gift. It’s a gift. You know, it’s just so great to just have the time to make something and have that vocation. And then afterwards, it’s pretty easy with letting it go.

Elise
Well, you know that they’re going to go to good homes, I imagine.

Scott
I hope so, yeah, and yeah, I think it’s great seeing that appreciation for the work and have them get taken on.It’s it’s definitely a blessing.

Elise
So have you in your mind, do you have any sort of memorable experiences of people reacting to your artwork? Just you have a memory that sticks out in your mind.

Scott
Yeah, I think at openings or at shows like talking to my friends and just having great conversations with other artists I think are memorable whenever kids see my work or react to my work. It’s like, it just brings me so much joy. My clients come by with their kids maybe and point at the painting and look at it, and yeah, just to know that your part. Yeah. You might have a small role in inspiring some some younger people. I think those are very important to me and very memorable.

Elise
Yeah, I love how kids look at work, they just come with such a fresh perspective. So let’s talk about kids again. You went to art school, correct, for a little bit,and I was just wondering, do you think art school is a must for today’s emerging artists?

Scott
I wouldn’t say it’s a must, but I do think, like. You get a lot out of. I think the students mindset going into this, the school is like as important as the lessons they might receive. So like how willing, are they to to learn and and how passionate they are about, how motivated they are to learn, I think that’s what makes the most difference for me it kind of gave me a really good foundation for conceptual thinking, art history, getting exposed to other artist’s lives and what that looks like. And something to aspire to. So, yeah, I think it’s great if your mind’s in the right place for sure.

Elise
That makes sense to me. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given and what piece of advice might you offer an emerging artist?

Scott
I would say. Document your work.

Elise
That is good advice as someone that’s

Scott
Yeah that’s right, I didn’t even think about that, but yes, it is so important to document your work, especially when you have an exhibition to have those all those all those paintings are going to be in the same place ever again. Having a catalog of yourself, of your your own body of work is extremely important. So. Yeah, that stuff, once a painting’s gone, it’s a lot harder to wrangle it back to get a good picture of it. So, you know, that’s extremely important to catalogue and document the work. That’s something. But also tell your own story, your painting. I think that’s I mean, that seems like a kind of a cliche, obvious advice to give to an artist. But it’s yeah, it takes a long time to kind of figure that one out. So, yeah.

Elise
You start with a reason.

Elise
On the other side, do you collect art yourself?

Scott
I do, yeah, a little bit. I’m starting to a little bit more, but I have a tiny apartment, so it’s pretty well full now. So yeah, when I, when I get more walls, I definitely think I’ll dive into that a little bit more.

Elise
Would you have any what would you like to suggest or advise new collectors about building a collection?

Scott
I would say maybe there’s, At least for me, I think there’s often like what you think will look good in your home versus, Work that is interesting to you. I think. If I were to give advice, I would say maybe look outside of your own esthetic. Esthetically pleasing work would look like or outside of your esthetic atmosphere, I guess, and because I think art has the potential to show us something new or show something different. So art doesn’t always have to align with your taste if you’re willing to give it a shot.

Elise
That’s excellent advice. I think it allows it also allows you the possibility of having your taste change through a work of art.

Scott
Definitely

Elise
So we’re coming up to the 1:30 mark.I have so many more questions for you, but I think what we’ll do is we’ll open it up to some of our audience members.

Elise
If not, I might take the next five more minutes to ask some more questions of my own, but yes, feel free to type of question in the chat and I’d be happy to ask Scott.

Elise
So let’s talk about the art world a little bit. Do you follow the art world? Are there any trends you’ve noticed and are paying attention to?

Scott
Yes, I do follow the art world. I try to stay informed. Yeah, I think in terms of trends. That’s a that’s a hard one, I think. I definitely see a bit more. I want to say, like. More specific ideas being explored and, and if it’s like representational work, we’re seeing a lot more. Kind of like a rejection of accuracy in terms of, what that representation is depicting, so a little bit more. This kind of, weird, surreal depictions of real-life things, I’m seeing a lot of that and just more contrast overall. Hypercolor works. Yeah, it’s really hard to pinpoint the trends in the art world because it is so vast, right?

Elise
Oh, yeah. And it seems like there has been like more of I’ve heard it called zombie figuration as opposed to, like, zombie abstraction. Like, yeah. Like taking off these, like, hyper-real pop figures almost, but like putting them in surreal landscapes. But like, I can’t remember the name of the artist, but she paints Broun’s in like classical figurative poses.

Elise
I’ll send it to you later.

Scott
But yeah zombie figuration is sort of what I was sort of loosely referring to earlier. So thanks for pointing that that genre point it.

Elise
I’m pretty sure someone wrote an article about it. I read too much.

Scott
So I think I think I saw like. Yeah. Someone someone published an article about.

Scott
I think it was like Jerry Saltz or something.

Elise
Oh, yeah, he definitely has his finger in everything.

Elise
What about everyone’s talking about them, but non fungible tokens NFT‘s, would you dip your finger to the world of crypto?

Scott
I don’t know,I think right now it’s going to be a no for me, I really enjoy the memes. They’re they’re hilarious and they really crack me up. But, yeah, it’s. It’s hard for me to say I’m glad it’s giving certain people the opportunity right now, but in terms of yeah, thanks for bringing that up because in terms of trends, that’s definitely one that’s like really, really hot. Right, right now. But. Yeah, I’ve been trying to read both sides of that story, and I think I don’t know, I’m too deep rooted in the physicality of the painting in the real world. So I’m prepared to die on that hill.

Elise
So, yeah, I think it’s it’s a good hill to die on, a solid hill a real lot of rich people one.

Scott
Exactly.

Elise
OK, well, just to wrap up then, if there are no further questions

Scott
in the chat there?

Elise
Yeah, there’s a question to see more work. So I directed them to the website. I can put your website as well. Scott, it’s www.scottsueme.com Right?

Scott
Yep,

Elise
OK. Oh, pixel4xl has a question, what is it? I would be happy to ask it.

Question from audience
it the mic working?

Scott
Yes, it worked awesome, thank you.

Question from audience
How are you guys doing? Nice, nice. I had a question for Scott. Scott being as you were, you know, starting out in your career, I think I read somewhere you did some graffiti work and some style writing stuff. Do you find that that background still finds its way into your current work, or are you kind of trying to be void of that past influence?

Scott
Thanks for your question. Yeah, I think it still makes its way into my work, just not in a traditional way, I think my time spent doing graffiti or doing style writing for those that letter-based those who don’t know, style writing is like, it’s basically a letter based movement in graffiti where it strictly focuses on the inventiveness of creating letterforms and pretty elaborate pieces that just showcase the, it’s very nuanced, it’s very specific with has its own trends. It has its own regional influences and cultural influences amongst that. Nowadays, it’s much more blown out into the incorporation of street art and different explorations of graffiti as a genre, as a whole, but style writing is sort of like a subgenre with graffiti. And that’s kind of where I spent most of my time exploring my work, but I think, again, it sort of shows up in my work, not in the same esthetic way, but maybe in how, colour combinations are put together or how the forms in my work kind of gel together. So I definitely look at it as a evolution of my time spent there. I don’t I don’t see it as like a rejection to it. I see it more as like a deeper exploration that that allows just a bit more interpretation outside of that subgenre, a different kind of meaning. So, yeah, I think it shows up and maybe not in the stat sheets of how you would how you would, you would think. But it does have these subtle things in the process that I definitely like. And thinking I’m always relating back to my time spent style writing, and it’s giving me a foundation for how I think about my work, which has been really helpful. So just the average viewer might not be able to make those connections esthetically. That’s that’s all. But, yeah, thanks for your question, but it’s it’s definitely nice to nice to discuss those ideas in detail.

Question from audience
Yeah, thank you for answering me, and that’s a really interesting perspective, and it’s cool to see the progression of your work.

Question from audience
And also, you know, I think I knew your graffiti stuff before I even knew you did studio work. So it’s really cool to see that parallel between the two.

Scott
Oh, that’s that’s so great to hear. Thank you so much.

question from audience
No problem.

Elise
Thank you so much for your question, were there any more? One way to beat this time.

Question from audience
I was going to say I could ask a few more questions if no one else is going to ask anything ?

Elise
Go go ahead. If you wouldn’t mind asking another question, you’d be welcome to.

Question from audience
Sure. So, Scott, knowing that you do some murals and whatnot as well outside of the studio, is mural something you’re still looking forward to doing in the future, or are you aiming to just do more studio stuff?

Scott
Thanks for your question, yeah, I think I am looking to do. More murals, I think studio work could definitely become my primary focus, but I am exploring a couple of projects at the moment that are mural based or installation based. Public art is something I definitely want to continue exercising and continue working on. But it’s it’s it definitely has to be kind of the right project for me. So something that I, I get excited about, something that maybe it’s a little bit different or a good. A good opportunity for me to add something, something different to my portfolio, so I would say I am not seeking the mural work as hard as I used to before I got into more heavily into painting and studio. It is something that I remember just going to clothing stores or or just actually like knocking on people’s door, like cold calling people to try and get them to give me their walls for murals and definitely come around since since those early days. But I would say I’m still interested in doing public art, doing murals. I just think it’s got to be the right opportunity for me now so that we’ll see how that how that takes shape in the future.

Elise
Thank you.

Elise
We have another call ?

question from audience
Can you hear me? I also have a question.

question from audience
Do you think we can get a quick little tour of your studio? Like you said, you do woodworking and painting. I’m just interested in seeing what your setup is like.

Scott
Oh awesome, I’d love to give you a little tour.

Elise
Yeah, just do a spin around for us.

Scott
There you go. All right, so I’ve got two studio mates. My one really close friend is named Billy Hughes Ceramic. Ceramic ceramicist, I should say, and here’s kind of his little section. He’s got his wheel down over here and then. This is where I do most of my painting. So this cart I have just on wheels kind of just pulls out, so when I need to do some work, i’ll kind of wheel it out over here and all my different paints there. And this is glass where I mix all the colours and yeah, that’s my main wall. And this is my pride and joy right here, this is the work table I’ve been working on for the last year and it’s a for woodworking, so we kind of built-in a router here. We finished that last week and the table saw is all integrated in this table. So when we need to do woodworking, we just kind of wheel this guy out and cut down all our plywood or sheet goods on this thing. And when we want to paint, I have a piece of cardboard that just goes over the top and it becomes a surface for a painting. And over here in the back, this is where we’ll have more tools, mitre saw and a drill press. And this is our little kitchen coffee machine and everything. Yeah, this is where paintings get stored. Over here. This is my other studio mate, James Knight. He does more figurative painting, so he kind of has a very similar setup to me.

Scott
He works with spray paint. And acrylic oils as well, that we kind of. Have our carts and we just wheel them out when we’re working, so, yeah, that is the studio.

Elise
Wow, I feel like I’m on MTV.

Scott
I haven’t showed you the fish tank yet.

Elise
Oh, yes. Show us the fish tank.

Scott
I’m just kidding. There’s no fish tank.

Elise
You see how excited I got? Well, that was inspiring.

Elise
I think. I think I’ll have to clean my studio after this.

Scott
I just cleaned it.

Scott
So it’s normally totally normally not like this. But yeah, I do get a lot of people are like, oh, how do you keep your studio so clean? And yeah, truthfully, it’s not it’s not always clean.

Elise
It’s come out.

Elise
OK, well is there any other questions. We have time for one more.

question from audience
I’ve got one more for you.

Elise
Please go ahead.

Question from audience
So before you were in a studio and before you really kind of knew what you wanted to do with the studio, what was your early studio like? Was it in a living room or how did you start doing your first kind of studio work?

Scott
Great question. Yeah, I when I first moved out of my parent’s place, I live with my friend Colin and we were both really into art and we were both starting out are sort of like freelance careers.

Scott
So it was. A really fun, enjoyable time, we both like living on our own and and just wild kids that just wanted to do art. Twenty four, seven. So I think we started like. One on one night, you just, like, put dropsheets down in our kitchen and both tried to work on some painting and it was just at that point where, like, we’ve got to find studio space. And I think in that the next day we sort of put the word out or asked a few artists and there was like a building opening up in the Downtown Eastside that was just building out artist studios. So it was kind of like a stroke of luck that we, got to see the space before the drive. It was, I think, like an old grocery store and they were subdividing two floors into all these little cubicle, not cubicles, but like little rooms for artists. And we got a I think it’s like a five hundred square foot studio in that building. And yeah, so I’ve always worked out a shared studio spaces with with friends. And that first space was much smaller than this one, and I think at one point we had like six or seven artists working there towards the end. Early on it was just kind of the four of us. And I think we just at least I was using it to just explore painting, really just doing that, and then eventually I was all was doing like more graphic design and mural painting and commercial like commercial work sign painting, was doing a lot of just whatever I could get and really using the studio in my spare time to kind of work on my own paintings and so I kind of look at it as like an investment I was making while trying to earn a living. And my second space was much of the same story. But maybe the project got a little bit bigger. And I was able on a year year, I was I was able to donate maybe larger amounts of time to my own. My own painting and less in other years, but all in all, I was continually trying to put time into into developing that work and, yeah, I think that answered your question, I’m not sure, but yeah, OK, cool, yeah, my earlier space was just yeah, I just got into it just on a whim. Got lucky, which was fortunate enough to have friends that were willing to go in on this kind of vision with me. And I got my foot in the door. But yeah, slowly kind of. This built it up over time, so.

Question from audience
Super cool, thanks, man.

Scott
Thanks very welcome.

Elise
Building it up over time, very on note of your exhibition, which is currently running at Mayberry Fine Art Tuxedo, I think, until the end of the month, as well I just want to remind you, for those who don’t know about it, we do have something called a collector profile on our website. And if you sign up for it, it gives you advance notification so you’ll never miss out on what Scott Sueme’s doing. I want to thank you so much for joining us today.

Elise
It has been wonderful talking to you and I hope you enjoy the rest of your day.

Scott
Oh, thank you so much. Thanks for everyone to for tuning in and listening. It really means the world to me. And thank you for putting this on It was really fun.

Literally, my pleasure. I like to call myself the Oprah of the art world. No just kidding.

Scott
Definitely.

Elise
OK, thank you everyone for tuning in. This will be available eventually on our website. So thanks again. And we’ll talk to you soon.

Scott
Great.Bye

Elise
Bye.

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