Lynn Chadwick Wanted for Purchase or Consignment

(1914 - 2003) CBE,

Lynn Chadwick was one of the leading British sculptors of post-war Britain. Born in Barnes, London in 1914, Chadwick was launched at the 1956 Venice Biennale, surprising the audience with his departure from previously dominant sculptural traditions and materials. Chadwick won the coveted prize for sculpture that year, the youngest sculptor ever to do so. He went on to an international reputation, and was appointed Commander, Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1964.
The characteristics of a Chadwick sculpture - form, stance, line, balance and attitude - are arrived at through his unique method of working. Whereas an architect might draw lines on a page; Chadwick developed a technique of taking steel rods and welding them together in space to criss-cross, join and radiate out, which formed three-dimensional shapes in space (armatures) akin to the architect’s space frame. He tended not to do a sketch beforehand – his sketches in his workbook came after the work was completed. The armature, formed by the welded rods, was filled with an industrial compound called Stolit, a mixture of iron filings and plaster that could be applied wet and, when dry, chased to achieve the surface Chadwick desired - sometimes textured, sometimes smooth – a skin, as it were, but with the original rods still visible. He often described his sculptures as being like crabs with their bones on the outside. This external armature was to define Chadwick’s imagery.
Although Chadwick continued to construct his sculptures by this method, in the late 1950s he decided to cast them in the more durable medium of bronze, which also allowed him to expand his practice from unique sculptures into editions. His unique construction method determines Chadwick’s personal imagery: multiple rods welded together grow into skinny heads, legs and capes in later works. He was able to explore endless variations to great effect. Looking back at his whole body of work, it is possible to see his work developing from mobiles and stabiles in the early 1950s into to animal forms, then evolving into more obvious figurative sculpture. Even at its most abstract and geometric, there is usually an allusion to natural forms in Chadwick’s work that underpins and gives vitality to it. Chadwick mainly created single or paired figures, but on occasion groups of three figures. The figures interact both with each other but also with the viewer of the sculpture. What is surprising while looking at his work is how personal it remains, and how timeless. He gave few interviews and would rather discuss the formal and practical nature of constructing his sculpture than its meaning. He often spoke of the feeling that he was just the craftsman. Lynn Chadwick died at his home Lypiatt Park, Gloucestershire, in 2003, aged 88.

Historical Sale Highlights

Following is a random selection of collectible works we have previously sold. Refresh this page to see more items.

Sunset, Lake of the Woods 197/300
Walter Joseph Phillips
colour woodcut (7.125x8.375 in) 1928
Sold
view details
Mist Fantasy
James Edward Hervey MacDonald
Sampson-Matthews Silkscreen (30x39.75 in) circa 1942
Sold
view details
The Threshing Crew’s Lunch Break
William Kurelek
Mixed Media on Board (23.5x30 in)
Sold
view details
Visiting Friends
Allen Sapp
Acrylic (20x16 in) 1973
Sold
view details
Getting Wood at Little Pine Reserve
Allen Sapp
oil (24x36 in) 1970
Sold
view details
Whistler Edge
Robert Genn
Acrylic (11x14 in) 2013
Sold
view details
Shoreline Scene
Farquhar McGillivray Knowles
oil on panel (8x5.5 in) 1880
Sold
view details
Caughnawaga Indians at Camp
Cornelius Krieghoff
oil on canvas (17x26 in) 1860
Sold
view details
Deer at Sunset
Maud Lewis
oil on board (11.75x13.75 in) circa 1957
Sold
view details
Blue Ice Lake Wonish
Anne Savage
oil on canvas (36x40 in) 1935
Sold
view details